OncoLink Poll: Sun Safety

Posted July 21st, 2017

  Take our August poll and see how you compare! Sun safety is a hot topic in the summer (though it deserves attention all year long!).  Learn more about sun safety on OncoLink.


How To Live With Knowing – And Not Knowing – The Future

Posted June 29th, 2017

For a second time, I’m reading When Breath Becomes Air by surgeon and author Paul Kalanithi. At age 36 and on a career path that was spiraling upward, Dr. Kalanithi was rudely interrupted. By a lung cancer diagnosis. I had originally highlighted several passages in the book, but one that stood out the second time around […]


Bob Riter

Cancer-Related Fatigue

Posted June 19th, 2017

When people think about the side effects of cancer treatment, they usually think about hair loss (which is common with some types of chemotherapy), and nausea (which is not nearly as common as it used to be). But in my experience, fatigue is the side effect that’s most universal and least appreciated. Fatigue is different […]


Maintaining Bonds With Our Deceased Loved Ones

Posted June 9th, 2017

The park on my parents-in-law’s ranch in the remote hills of northern California had been decorated in fernery, and Gary and I were married beneath the monkey bars (don’t read anything into that). My father-in-law, Jack, had welded together adult-sized playground equipment in a stand of tall, fragrant trees above their ranch house. There was the swing with […]


Karen Arnold-Korzeniowski, BSN, RN

Taking Control of Your Cancer Experience

Posted June 7th, 2017

In many cases, patients feel some loss of control when diagnosed with cancer. Cancer can very quickly consume your life. You may have to stop working to get treatment, you may have to avoid social situations if you are neutropenic, you might not be able to eat the foods you like because of nausea. Cancer […]


10 Ways to Become Infected with ‘Helper’s High’, Even After a Cancer Diagnosis

Posted May 25th, 2017

Did you know that giving and volunteering stimulate the reward center in the brain, releasing endorphins and creating what is known as helper’s high? And like other highs, this one is also addictive. My husband, Gary, volunteered at Shepherd’s House, a men’s rescue mission, three mornings a week for two or three years while living with terminal […]


Bob Riter

Questions to Ask Yourself Before Giving Medical Advice on Facebook

Posted May 22nd, 2017

I’m often startled by the medical advice that people give to their friends on Facebook. Sometimes it takes the form of saying, “You should do this,” but often it’s more subtle and simply involves sharing a link. Before people post something of this nature, I wish that they would consider the following questions: Have you […]


Putting Dreams on Paper

Posted May 18th, 2017

I’m at a coffee shop—one of those fabulous local places where the high ceilings thrum with industrial pipes and funky lighting, and a large garage door is open to let in the mountain air—waiting for two of my creative team members. Jim and Michelle are meeting me here to brainstorm over some needed changes to […]


Bob Riter

Making Friends With Your Oncologist

Posted May 12th, 2017

An oncologist once remarked to me that her patients routinely told her about their personal lives – like they were trying to strike up friendships. I can understand this. It’s not that patients expect their oncologists to invite them over for dinner, but there is a desire to make some sort of human connection. I’m […]


How Spontaneous Are You?

Posted May 10th, 2017

On a fine spring day this week, I had a hankering (what a great word, hankering … does anyone use that word anymore?) to trek back to the place where I scattered my husband’s ashes after he died of cancer, after he lived much much longer than the original prognosis: Ten preposterous brimming courageous years with late […]