Books


B

Barium Enema--Use of barium sulfate introduced into the intestinal tract by an enema to allow X-ray exam of the large bowel.

Basal Cell Carcinoma--The most common form of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma grows slowly and seldom spreads to other areas of the body. It is easily detected and cured when treated promptly.

Benign Tumor--An abnormal growth that is not cancer and does not spread to other areas of the body.

Bilateral--Pertaining to both sides of the body. For example, bilateral breast cancer.

Biological Response Modifiers--A new class of compounds produced in the body, such as interferon, that fight cancer by stimulating the body's immune system.

Biopsy--The surgical removal of a small piece of tissue for microscopic examination to determine if cancer cells are present. Biopsy is the most important procedure in diagnosing cancer.

Blood Count--Examination of a blood specimen in which the number of white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets are determined. For example, in patients with leukemia, the blood count may show an abnormally high number of white blood cells.

Bone Marrow--The soft, fatty substance filling the cavities of bones. Blood cells are manufactured in bone marrow. The bone marrow is sampled in leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma and other cancers affecting blood cells to determine the diagnosis and response to treatment.

Bone Marrow Biopsy and Aspiration--A procedure in which a needle is inserted into the center of a bone, usually the hip or breast bone, to remove a small amount of bone marrow for microscopic examination.

Brain Scan--A technique in which radioactive dye is injected into a vein, so that images of the brain can be recorded. Brain scans may be used for the detection of cancers starting in brain tissue or from other areas of the body.

Breast Self-Exam (BSE)--A simple procedure to examine breasts thoroughly; recommended once a month for all women to do themselves between regular physician checkups.





News
Early Palliative Care in Lung CA Focuses on Coping, Symptoms

Jan 31, 2013 - Early palliative care clinic visits, integrated with standard oncologic care for patients with metastatic lung cancer, emphasize symptom management, coping, and psychosocial aspects of illness, according to research published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Internal Medicine.



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