Current Concepts in the Management of Colorectal Cancer

Last Modified: November 10, 2002

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Conference Dates: Friday, January 10, 2003
Conference Location: The Rittenhouse Hotel, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA


Sponsoring Group: The Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania

Conference Brochure:
Brochure View the full conference brochure as a PDF.
You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader which is available free online, in order to view this file.

Who Should Attend: Colon and Rectal Surgeons, Surgical Oncologists, Radiation Oncologists, Medical Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and other health care professionals involved in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer.

Conference Objectives: At the completion of the program, participants should be able to:

  1. Evaluate the role of new chemotherapeutic and biologic agents in colorectal cancer treatment
  2. Review standard therapy for the management of colorectal cancer
  3. Relate recent information on the basic biology and causation of colorectal cancer

Who Should Attend: Pathologists, Hematopathologists, Oncology Nurses, Oncology Social Workers, Radiation Oncologists

Registration Information: The registration deadline is Friday, December 27, 2002. To register, complete the enclosed form (see the PDF form linked above). Contact at Mary Graham with questions.

Conference Fees: The registration fee is $160.00 for physicians and $95.00 for nurses and other health care pro-fessionals. Registration includes tuition, conti-nental breakfast, lunch, and program materials. Fees will be waived for faculty, staff, fellows, and students of the University of Pennsylvania./p>

Continuing Education: The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical educa-tion for physicians.


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