Follow up mammography

Last Modified: July 21, 2003

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Question

Dear OncoLink "Ask The Experts,"
My mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. I am 36 years old, when I went for my yearly check up, they sent me to have a mammogram since I now have a family history. The results came back saying I have a 4 mm nodule in my right breast possibly negative, recheck in 6 months. I would like to have it checked sooner. My mother was told several times that her lump was probably benign. How can I get my doctor to send me in for further testing sooner or should I just relax and continue to wait? 

Answer

Lawrence J. Solin, MD, FACR, Professor of Radiation Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania, responds:

Screening for breast cancer generally includes mammography, breast self examination (BSE), and physical examination by a physician. Screening mammography can sometimes show findings that are uncertain if a breast cancer is present, and follow-up mammography (usually in 6 months) or further work-up may be indicated. For some situations further work-up with additional breast imaging studies (for example, ultrasound or MRI [magnetic resonance imaging]) may provide important information. The physician is usually the best person to guide these important decisions. A second opinion with a breast cancer specialist, usually a breast surgeon, can sometimes be valuable.


News
Specificity Up With Stereoscopic Mammography for CA Detection

Jan 21, 2013 - Three-dimensional stereoscopic digital mammography significantly improves the specificity and accuracy of breast cancer detection, with a lower patient recall rate and a sensitivity comparable to that of standard digital mammography in a high-risk population, according to research published in the January issue of Radiology.



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