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September 2012 Briefing - Hematology & Oncology

Monday, October 1, 2012 (Last Updated: 10/02/2012)

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Hematology & Oncology for September 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

SNPs Linked to Erectile Dysfunction After Radiotherapy

FRIDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with development of erectile dysfunction (ED) following radiotherapy for prostate cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics.

Abstract
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Young BRCA Carriers Face Complex Life-Altering Decisions

FRIDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For young women, carrying a BRCA mutation impacts actions and decisions related to getting married, having children, and receiving a diagnosis of breast cancer, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Nursing.

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Denosumab Studied As Therapy for Giant-Cell Tumor of Bone

THURSDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with giant-cell tumor of bone (GCTB), denosumab treatment causes a significant reduction in tumor giant cells and increased growth of new bone, according to a study published in the Aug. 15 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract
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Stivarga Approved for Advanced Colorectal Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Stivarga (regorafenib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat colorectal cancer that has spread despite prior treatment.

colon and rectal cancer

New Transplant Platform Successful in Sickle Cell

THURSDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Non-myeloablative conditioning with post-transplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide expands the donor pool for bone marrow transplantation for patients with sickle cell disease, according to a preliminary study published online Sept. 6 in Blood.

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Short-, Long-Course Therapy Comparable in T3 Rectal Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- There are no statistically significant differences in the rates of local recurrence (LR), distant recurrence, relapse-free survival, overall survival, or late toxicity in patients treated with short-course (SC) radiotherapy or long-course (LC) chemoradiation, according to research published online Sept. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Conditional Reprogramming Can Help ID Pathogenic Viruses

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Conditional reprogramming can be successfully used to generate cell cultures from normal and tumor tissue of a patient with papillomatosis, facilitating identification of a mutant human papillomavirus (HPV) and allowing appropriate treatment, according to a study published in the Sept. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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When Clinically Indicated, Chemo Use High for Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than half of women with localized breast cancer for whom adjuvant chemotherapy is discretionary, either due to clinical factors or age, tend to utilize adjuvant chemotherapy; however, when clinically indicated, women initiate chemotherapy at a high rate, according to research published online Sept. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Watch & Wait OK in Low-Tumor Burden Follicular Lymphoma

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- An initial watch-and-wait strategy does not have a detrimental effect on the freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) or overall survival rate in selected patients with low-tumor burden follicular lymphoma compared with patients initially treated with rituximab-containing regimens, according to research published online Sept. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Editorial

Best Mouse Model of Tumor Drug Exposure Identified

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with mouse or human melanomas transplanted into mice, a genetically-engineered mouse melanoma model best approximates the tumor pharmacokinetics of a melanoma drug observed in patients, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in The Oncologist.

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Surveillance for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Examined

MONDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For men with low-risk prostate cancer, projections show that active surveillance may result in a modest decline in prostate cancer-specific survival, but allows men to remain treatment-free for several more years compared with immediate radical prostatectomy, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Genetic Variants Identified for Risk of Male Breast Cancer

MONDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with an increased risk of male breast cancer have been identified, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Nature Genetics.

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Skin Cancer Incidence Up After Pancreas Transplantation

FRIDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) commonly occur after pancreas transplantation (PT), particularly in those who have a history of skin cancer, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Patient Preference Doesn't Affect Chemo in Advanced CRC

FRIDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), most patients are treated with chemotherapy, even if they express negative or marginal preferences, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Cancer.

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Bladder Cancer Survival Similar for Partial, Radical Cystectomy

THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- For select patients with bladder cancer, there is no difference in metastasis-free or cancer-specific survival with partial cystectomy (PC) or radical cystectomy (RC), but there is an increased risk for intravesical recurrence for those treated with PC, according to research published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Alcohol-Related Esophageal Cancer Risk Is Reversible

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The alcohol-related effects on esophageal cancer risk are reversible with cessation of alcohol consumption, according to research published in the July issue of Addiction.

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Drug Class Unexpectedly Effective on Breast Cancers

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs that normally target cancer cells defective in DNA homologous recombination repair, poly(ADP-Ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, are also effective on breast cancer cells positive for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), even in the absence of the repair defect, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of Cancer Research.

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Nearly Half of European Mortality Due to Cancer, Chronic Disease

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Deaths from cancer and chronic diseases accounted for approximately 42 percent of deaths in 2007 across the European Union (EU), according to a study published online Aug. 28 in BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care.

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Breast Tumor's Molecular Subtype Key in Treatment Choice

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Molecular subtypes are predictors of breast cancer mortality and can play a role in determining the best course of treatment to follow, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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New Guidelines Issued for Pediatric Fever and Neutropenia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- New evidence-based guidelines have been compiled on the management of fever and and neutropenia (FN) in children with cancer and/or who are undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation; the guidelines were published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Biomarkers Identified in Head and Neck Cancers

TUESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with head and neck cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection predicts survival when determined by viral load and viral gene expression rather than the presence of viral DNA or expression of the p16 tumor suppressor gene, according to two studies published online Sept. 18 in Cancer Research.

Abstract - Holzinger
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Abstract - Liang
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Abiraterone Prolongs Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Abiraterone acetate significantly improves overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that has progressed after docetaxel treatment, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in The Lancet Oncology.

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L-Carnitine Does Not Reduce Cancer-Related Fatigue

TUESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with invasive malignancies who take L-carnitine supplements do not experience a reduction in fatigue, pain, or depression, according to research published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Melanoma Transection Doesn't Affect Overall Survival

TUESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Melanoma transection does not affect disease-free survival or mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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No Increased Cancer Risk With Herpes Zoster Infection

MONDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- There is no increased risk of cancer among patients with newly diagnosed herpes zoster infection, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Cancer Incidence and Mortality Declining for Hispanics

MONDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer incidence and death rates seem to be declining for Hispanics, but screening use is lower than for non-Hispanic whites, according to two studies published online Sept. 17 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

Abstract - Siegel
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Abstract - Cokkinides
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Long-Term Finasteride Doesn't Impair Quality of Life

THURSDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Taking finasteride to prevent prostate cancer does not negatively affect the physical function, mental health, or vitality domains of health-related quality of life, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
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European Review: Benefits of Mammograms Outweigh Harms

THURSDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For women in Europe, mammographic screening is associated with a reduction in breast cancer mortality that is greater than the potential harms of over-diagnosis and false-positive screening results (FPRs), according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Medical Screening.

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Thermal Sensation Spared in Nerve-Sparing Prostatectomy

THURSDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Penile thermal sensory thresholds increase after non-nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP) but not after the nerve-sparing procedure, according to a study published in the September issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Preparation Process Eases MRI for Children With Sickle Cell

THURSDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For young children with sickle cell disease (SCD), preparation and support procedures (PSP) can help reduce the need for sedation during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, according to a study published online June 19 in Pediatric Radiology.

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Review: Inflammation's Role in Obesity-Colorectal Cancer Link

THURSDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A new review summarizes the ways in which inflammation and altered metabolism are associated with colorectal cancer in obese individuals; the review was published online Sept. 3 in Obesity Reviews.

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Study Supports IL16 Role in Prostate CA in African-Americans

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In African-Americans, IL16 polymorphisms appear to play a role in prostate cancer susceptibility, according to research published online Aug. 24 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Rare Cancer Syndrome Linked to Lower Diabetes Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- People with Cowden syndrome, with tumor-suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) mutations that increase their risk of cancer, have enhanced sensitivity to insulin even though they are more likely to be obese, according to a study published in the Sept. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Pregnancy-Associated Cancers on the Rise in Australia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of pregnancy-associated cancers is increasing in Australia, with the increase only partially explained by increasing maternal age, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Persistence of Statin Use Linked to Decreased Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- There is an inverse association between statin persistence and cancer risk, particularly for hematopoietic malignancies, according to a study published in the September issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Flow Cytometry Indicates Treatment Response in AML

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- For children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), minimal residual disease (MRD) activity, as measured using flow cytometry, is a good indicator of treatment response, with morphologic analysis providing limited additional information, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Genomic Alterations ID'd in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Genomic characterization of lung squamous cell carcinomas has identified several statistically recurrent mutations, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in Nature.

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SPECT/CT Associated With Improved Survival in Melanoma

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with clinically lymph node-negative melanoma, the use of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) to aid sentinel lymph node excision (SLNE) is associated with increased detection of metastatic involvement and improved disease-free survival, compared with standard SLNE, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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PTSD Seen in Nearly 20 Percent of Young Children With Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 20 percent of infants and preschoolers with cancer suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a study published online Aug. 22 in Psycho-Oncology.

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Adding Ketamine to Opioids Doesn't Reduce Cancer Pain

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Using subcutaneously administered ketamine in a dose-escalating regimen as an adjunct to opioids and standard co-analgesics does not have any clinical benefit in relieving cancer pain, but it is associated with increased toxicity, according to research published online Sept. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Molecular Differences ID'd for Small/Non-Small Cell Lung CA

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Molecular differences have been identified in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, which may represent potential therapeutic targets, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Cancer Discovery.

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Cancer Survivors Uneasy With Primary Care Doctor Follow-Up

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Early-stage cancer survivors have concerns about receiving cancer-related follow-up care from primary care physicians, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Marijuana Use Linked to Higher Risk of Testicular Cancer

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Marijuana use is associated with an approximately two-fold higher risk of testicular cancer, particularly nonseminoma and mixed histology tumors, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Cancer.

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Cognitive Deficits for Chemo-Treated Breast Cancer Patients

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer survivors who were previously treated with chemotherapy experience small cognitive deficits in the domains of verbal ability and visuospatial ability, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Diagnostic Radiation Ups Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA Carriers

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- For BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, exposure to diagnostic radiation before age 30 correlates with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer, with a dose-response pattern, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in BMJ.

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Not All Docs/Nurses Want to Be Asked About Hand Hygiene

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Although most health care workers (HCWs) appreciate the role of patients in preventing health care-associated infection, a considerable proportion are uncomfortable with patients asking about their hand hygiene, according to a letter published online Sept. 3 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Neurocognitive Deficits Seen in Survivors of Pediatric Hodgkin's

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Adult long-term survivors of childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma are at risk for neurocognitive impairment, according to research published online Sept. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Characteristics of Long-Term Gastric Cancer Survivors ID'd

THURSDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer who survive for longer than three years after diagnosis seem to have distinct demographic and pathologic characteristics, compared with those who do not survive, according to research published online Sept. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Prone-Position Breast Radiation Avoids Heart, Lung Exposure

THURSDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- For most women with breast cancer, prone positioning during computed tomography (CT) simulation scans correlates with a reduction in the amount of heart and lung irradiation, according to a research letter published in the Sept. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Bosulif Approved for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Bosulif (bosutinib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), the agency said in a news release.

FDA

Intermittent ADT Noninferior to Continuous ADT for Prostate CA

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In men with prostate cancer who have rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after radiotherapy, overall survival is similar if they receive intermittent or continuous androgen-deprivation therapy, according to a study published in the Sept. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Reciprocal Increased Risk of Parkinson's, Prostate Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a significantly increased risk of prostate cancer and melanoma, which extends to their third-degree relatives, and there is evidence of a reciprocal risk, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Anthracycline, Trastuzumab for Breast CA Up Heart Failure Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- For women with incident, invasive breast cancer, treatment with anthracycline and trastuzumab is associated with an increased risk of heart failure and/or cardiomyopathy, compared to having no chemotherapy, according to a study published in the Sept. 5 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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No Increased Risk of Cancer With Biologics in Rheumatoid Arthritis

TUESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the use of biologic response modifiers (BRMs) for at least six months is not associated with an increased risk of malignancy compared with placebo or other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), according to a study published in the Sept. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Specialties Hematology & Oncology
Radiology
Pathology

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