Cancer News
OncoLink Cancer News - HealthDay


Brain Stimulation Reduces Smoking Cravings

Tuesday, April 23, 2013 (Last Updated: 04/24/2013)

TUESDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- High-frequency brain stimulation can temporarily reduce smoking cravings, according to a study published in the April 15 issue of Biological Psychiatry.

Xingbao Li, M.D., from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, and colleagues randomly assigned 16 nicotine-dependent patients to receive treatment with either real high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or active sham TMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

The researchers found that the real rTMS treatment significantly reduced cue-induced smoking craving compared with the sham treatment. When compared with neutral cue craving, the reduction after real rTMS was even greater. The reduction in craving after real rTMS was greater in patients with greater nicotine dependence and in those who smoked more cigarettes per day.

"In conclusion, the results of this preliminary study demonstrate that rTMS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex can temporarily suppress cue-induced smoking craving," Li and colleagues write. "This finding extends the results of previous studies and opens the way for further exploration of the use of brain stimulation techniques in smoking cessation treatment."

One author disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical and medical device companies.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Specialties Psychiatry
Internal Medicine
Neurology
Family Practice
Nursing

Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


I Wish You Knew

Making treatment decisions is difficult and you can ask for help

View More



Blogs and Web Chats

OncoLink Blogs give our readers a chance to react to and comment on key cancer news topics and provides a forum for OncoLink Experts and readers to share opinions and learn from each other.




OncoLink OncoPilot

Facing a new cancer diagnosis or changing the course of your current treatment? Let our cancer nurses help you through!

Learn More