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San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, Dec. 10-14

Thursday, December 19, 2013 (Last Updated: 12/20/2013)

The 36th Annual CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium

The annual meeting of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium was held from Dec. 10 to 14 in San Antonio and attracted more than 7,500 participants from around the world, including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, researchers, and other health care professionals. The conference highlighted recent advances in the risk, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer, with presentations focusing on emerging treatments in hard-to-treat patient populations, including patients with metastatic breast cancer. There were a total of 43 oral presentations of abstracts and 1,091 poster presentations.

In one study, Dev Paul, D.O., Ph.D., of the U.S. Oncology and Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers in Denver, and colleagues found that a combination of dasatinib plus letrozole delayed disease progression in women with hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative metastatic breast cancer.

"The key finding of this study was that letrozole plus dasatinib resulted in a doubling of the progression-free survival, to 20.1 months, as compared to 9.9 months with just letrozole," said Paul. "Before future studies are performed, we would like to find a set of biomarkers for c-Src, in order to better select those patients most likely to respond to dasatinib plus letrozole."

The study was supported by Bristol-Myers Squibb.

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In another study, Lucile Adams-Campbell, Ph.D., of the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington, D.C., and colleagues found that regular vigorous exercise was associated with a reduced risk of developing estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer among black women. Specifically, the investigators found that black women who exercised three or more hours per week had a 47 percent reduced risk of developing this type of breast cancer, compared to black women who exercised an average of one hour per week.

"These findings are very encouraging. Knowing that exercise may protect against breast cancers that disproportionately strike black women is of great public health importance," Adams-Campbell said in a statement. "We all want to do what we can to reduce our risk of disease and improve our health, and along with other well-known benefits, we now show that exercise can possibly stave off development of potentially lethal breast cancer in black women."

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In the BETH (bevacizumab and trastuzumab adjuvant therapy in HER2-positive breast cancer) study, Dennis J. Slamon, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of California in Los Angeles, and colleagues found that the combination of docetaxel and carboplatin with trastuzumab was an effective treatment option after surgery in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. The investigators aimed to evaluate whether the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy plus trastuzumab after surgery improved outcomes for patients with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer.

Patients were randomized to either docetaxel, carboplatin, and trastuzumab or docetaxel, carboplatin, and trastuzumab plus bevacizumab. After a median of 38 weeks of follow-up, the investigators found that disease-free survival was 92 percent for both groups evaluated in the study.

"These are among the best results we have seen to date in the adjuvant treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer," Slamon said in a statement. "In addition, the results of the trial are negative for any benefit from adding bevacizumab to adjuvant therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer. It does not appear to improve outcomes."

This study was supported by Roche/Genentech, with one author disclosing a financial relationship with the company.

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SABCS: Pre-Op Chemo Combo Aids Triple-Negative Breast CA

FRIDAY, Dec. 13, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- New presurgery chemotherapy combinations are beneficial for women with triple-negative breast cancer, according to two studies presented at the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held from Dec. 10 to 14 in San Antonio.

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SABCS: Exercise Eases Aromatase Inhibitor-Induced Arthralgia

THURSDAY, Dec. 12, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- For breast cancer survivors experiencing aromatase inhibitor (AI)-induced arthralgia, participating in an exercise intervention is beneficial, according to a study presented at the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held from Dec. 10 to 14 in San Antonio.

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SABCS: Drug Reduces Breast Cancer Risk in High-Risk Women

THURSDAY, Dec. 12, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Anastrozole reduces the risk of breast cancer by about half with few side effects in postmenopausal women at high risk of developing breast cancer, according to a study presented at the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held from Dec. 10 to 14 in San Antonio. The research was simultaneously published online Dec. 12 in The Lancet.

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SABCS: Radiotherapy Can Be Avoided in Some Breast Cancers

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 11, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Some older women with breast cancer who receive hormone treatment after surgical removal of the tumor can avoid radiotherapy, as radiotherapy has no significant effect on recurrence or survival, according to a study presented at the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held from Dec. 10 to 14 in San Antonio.

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SABCS: Mammography Benefit Disparities Due to Denominators

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 11, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Apparent disparities between different reviews on the benefit of mammography screening on breast cancer mortality are mainly due to different denominators, according to a study presented at the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held from Dec. 10 to 14 in San Antonio.

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SABCS: Study Examines Dual HER2 Blockade in Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 11, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- For human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive tumors, the combination of lapatinib and trastuzumab is better than either therapy alone, according to a study presented at the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held from Dec. 10 to 14 in San Antonio.

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Specialties Hematology & Oncology
OBGYN & Women's Health

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