Nilutamide (Nilandron®, Anandron®)

OncoLink Team
Last Modified: January 8, 2016

Pronounced: nye-LOO-tah-mide Classification: Anti-Androgen About Nilutamide Most prostate cancers need supplies of the male hormone testosterone to grow. Testosterone is an androgen (hormone) produced by the testes and adrenal glands. The production of testosterone can be stopped by surgically removing the testicles or through medication therapy. Anti-androgen medications (also called nonsteroidal anti-androgens) work by blocking testosterone receptors on the prostate cells, and therefore preventing testosterone from attaching to the receptors on the surface of the prostate cancer cells. Without testosterone, the cancer cells may either grow more slowly, or stop growing altogether. How to Take Nilutamide Nilutamide is given as a tablet, taken once a day, with or without food, preferably at the same time each day.Nilutamide can cause an intolerance of alcohol including facial flushing, malaise and low blood pressure.

Classification: Anti-Androgen About Nilutamide Most prostate cancers need supplies of the male hormone testosterone to grow. Testosterone is an androgen (hormone) produced by the testes and adrenal glands. The production of testosterone can be stopped by surgically removing the testicles or through medication therapy. Anti-androgen medications (also called nonsteroidal anti-androgens) work by blocking testosterone receptors on the prostate cells, and therefore preventing testosterone from attaching to the receptors on the surface of the prostate cancer cells. Without testosterone, the cancer cells may either grow more slowly, or stop growing altogether. How to Take Nilutamide Nilutamide is given as a tablet, taken once a day, with or without food, preferably at the same time each day.Nilutamide can cause an intolerance of alcohol including facial flushing, malaise and low blood pressure.

About Nilutamide (Nilandron®, Anandron®)

Most prostate cancers need supplies of the male hormone testosterone to grow. Testosterone is an androgen (hormone) produced by the testes and adrenal glands. The production of testosterone can be stopped by surgically removing the testicles or through medication therapy. Anti-androgen medications (also called nonsteroidal anti-androgens) work by blocking testosterone receptors on the prostate cells, and therefore preventing testosterone from attaching to the receptors on the surface of the prostate cancer cells. Without testosterone, the cancer cells may either grow more slowly, or stop growing altogether.

Patients can develop an inflammation of the lungs (called interstitial pneumonitis) while taking this medication. You may have a chest x-ray and pulmonary function tests prior to starting this therapy. Notify your healthcare provider right away if you develop any new or worsening symptoms, including shortness of breath, trouble breathing, chest pain, cough or fever.

Sexual and Reproductive Changes

This drug can affect your reproductive system, resulting in sperm production becoming irregular or stopping permanently. In addition, you may experience erectile dysfunction or a decreased desire for sex during treatment. Talk to your urologist about options for treating erectile dysfunction.

Keywords

Click on any of these terms for more related articles

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
R
S
T
U
V
X
Y
Z
#
 
A
B
C
E
F
G
H
K
L
M
N
O
P
R
S
T
U
V
 
 
Want up to date Cancer Treatment News? Subscribe to our eNewsletter. Subscribe Now