Cervical Cancer


Abnormal Pap After Cone Biopsy Abnormal PAP smears and observation Abnormal Pap test after Chemotherapy or Radiation Abnormal Pap With Negative HPV Adenocarcinoma in Situ of the Cervix Adenocarcinoma of the Cervix Are all cervical dysplasias associated with HPV? ASCUS follow up Bcl-2 Gene Expression Breast and Cervical cancer screening for teens Calcifications of the Cervix Causes for an abnormal Pap smear Cervical Cancer Cervical cancer treatment while pregnant Cervical Conization Cervical Dysplasia CIN 2/3 in Young Women CIN I CIS "carcinoma in situ" and CIN Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia explained Clearing HPV Virus Colposcopy During Pregnancy DES Exposure and Gynecologic Cancer Does a combination of HPV and birth control increase your chance of cervical cancer? High grade squamous intraepithelial lesion of the cervix HPV (human papilloma virus) Infection and Dysplasia HPV in Men HPV Reinfection HPV Transmission to a Surrogate Hysterectomy to treat cervical dysplasia Inflammation on your Pap smear Information on Carcinoma in Situ of the Cervix Instructions after a colposcopy Is cervical cancer hereditary? Is Circumcision Related to Cervical Cancer Risk? Is Hysterectomy for Cervical Cancer Necessary? Is squamous cancer of the cervix hereditary? Is there a link between cervical dysplasia and HPV? LEEP procedure and infertility LEEP vs. Hysterectomy LEEP while pregnant Link between cervical and ovarian cancers LLETZ (Large Loop Excision of the Transformation Zone) for cervical cancer Lymphedema after cervical cancer treatment Lymphedema and Leg Weakness Monitoring adenocarcinoma in situ of the cervix Monitoring after Colposcopy Multiple sexual partners as a risk factor for cervical cancer Muscle Loss after Radiation for Cervical Cancer Non-diagnostic results of endocervical curettage (ECC) Options after vaginal closure PAP Smears After Age 65 Pap smears on patients who are not sexually active Pap Tests After Hysterectomy Pelvic exenteration Physician qualifications Pre-colposcopy instructions Pregnancy after Cervical Conizations Pregnancy after LEEP Procedure Pregnancy after LLETZ procedure Pros and Cons of Laser, cryotherapy, LEEP or cone biopsy Radiation after radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer Radical vulvectomy for Bartholin's gland cancer Recurrence of cervical dysplasia (CIN) after treatment by LEEP Repeat Pap after Atypical squamous cells Risk factors for cervical cancer Risk of other cancers after cervical cancer Risks and reasons for repeat colposcopy and cone biopsy Risks of the LEEP procedure Sarcoma of the Cervix Sedation during a LEEP procedure Sex during Cervical Cancer Treatment Sexual Intercourse after a LEEP Procedure Side effects of radiation for cervical cancer Signs and Symptoms of Cervical Cancer Small cell cervical cancer Small cell cervical cancer Stage IB1 cervical cancer The Risks Of Colposcopy Timing of radiation after surgery for cervical cancer Treatment for Adenocarcinoma of the Cervix Treatment for CIN III Treatment for high-grade cervical dysplasia during pregnancy Treatment for stage 1B cervical cancer Treatment options for carcinoma in situ of the cervix Treatment options for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Treatment options for low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions of the cervix Vaginal discharge and pain after a pelvic exenteration Vaginal Dysplasia Vaginal dysplasia after cervical dysplasia Vaginal dysplasia after cervical dysplasia Vaginal Reconstruction Years After Pelvic Exenteration VIN vs. HPV Will cervical displaysia lead to cancer or infertility?

Blogs

In Celebration of Eric Ott
by Bob Riter
August 17, 2015

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