Bob Riter

A Health Professional in the Family

Posted August 7th, 2013

Sooner or later, someone in your family will be diagnosed with cancer. If you’re a doctor, nurse, scientist, or other health professional, you may feel obligated to help that person navigate through the decisions that need to be made.


Bob Riter

Getting Second Opinions

Posted July 24th, 2013

Cancer guidebooks are full of grandiose suggestions like “assemble a team of experts,” but most people don’t know where to begin.


Don’t Go Alone When the Diagnosis is Cancer

Posted June 26th, 2013

It’s important to have someone with you at doctor’s appointments when you’re dealing with a cancer diagnosis.


Adjusting to the New Normal

Posted June 19th, 2013

“The new normal” is a phrase used to describe how life changes for some people who have been through cancer.


What to Say When Cancer Returns

Posted June 12th, 2013

When cancer returns, the focus usually shifts from curing the cancer to controlling the cancer. It’s an entirely different situation from the initial diagnosis, and both patient and health professionals know it.


Questions Every Patient Should Ask

Posted June 6th, 2013

These three questions sound simple, but they aren’t asked nearly enough. It’s more than OK to ask – it’s encouraged!


Parking Lot Moment

Posted May 13th, 2013

You’re initially stunned when you hear the words, “You have cancer.” Your brain freezes and things are a blur for at least a few minutes.


Does Cancer Hurt?

Posted May 3rd, 2013

When I talk with groups of students, someone usually asks, “Does cancer hurt?” It’s an interesting question that can be answered on many different levels.


Don’t Look Back with Cancer

Posted April 5th, 2013

Nearly everyone with cancer wonders if they would be better off had they made different decisions somewhere along the line.


Too Little and Too Much Cancer Treatment

Posted January 29th, 2013

Although I firmly believe that everyone should be in control of their own treatment decisions, I have observed that some people seem to seek too little treatment when they are first diagnosed and other people seek too much treatment at the end of their lives.