A to Z On Living Well With Cancer

Posted February 22nd, 2017

Being an obsessive list-maker, if given the assignment to sum up the things Hubby’s cancer taught us about living and dying well with cancer—and if the assignment required an alphabetized list—it would look something like this (you’re going to need to work with me on a couple of these): Adversity It happens. None of us are […]


Saying Goodbye to My Mother: A Caregiver’s Story

Posted November 7th, 2016

By Kelly Baldwin Heid Six months after I lost my mom to BRCA-related breast cancer, LBBC asked if I would be willing to share my care-giving story. The words (and emotions) poured out of me – I could have gone on forever about my experience. Now, nearly five years later, my mother’s death—and the months […]


Bob Riter

After Being Diagnosed, Life Can Change Overnight

Posted July 20th, 2016

If your spouse or partner is diagnosed with cancer, your life changes. You worry about the future and your days are filled with appointments, tasks, and caregiving. If your spouse or partner is diagnosed with advanced cancer, your life changes even more radically. As one man told me, “It all changed overnight.” His wife, by […]


christina bach

Take Me Out To The…Cancer Game

Posted July 14th, 2016

Last night, like many others, I settled in to watch the mid-summer classic, the MLB All Star game. It’s not so much a game, as it is a spectacle. Last night, it also became a cancer spectacle—of standing up and never giving up the fight. This morning, as I thought about it more, I got […]


What a Great Cancer Support Team Looks Like

Posted July 5th, 2016

A spontaneous group hug from The Littles—can you count all four heads?—took place at the train station in New Jersey after hanging out with the youngest of my support team members. (The Teens, of course, are way too cool to do group hugs. Not that either of them were even out of bed when this photo was taken, […]


8 Cancer-Generated Secrets For Becoming More Attractive

Posted April 8th, 2016

If you’ve lost something to cancer that is of incredible value — your health, a way of life, someone who is precious beyond words — then it is important to grieve. To take your time and grieve in your own way. At some point, though, it will be to your advantage and good health to set aside […]


Bob Riter

Take the right person with you to medical appointments

Posted January 29th, 2016

In a recent article, I encouraged people with cancer to take someone with them when they went to important medical appointments. When you hear the words, “You have cancer,” you tend to have trouble remembering anything else. Today, I want to suggest who to take with you on those appointments. Take someone who listens more […]


Rodney Warner

Giver of Care

Posted November 19th, 2015

Every cancer patient ideally should have a care giver. One who can look after the person, get him or her to appointments and help them with their physical and emotional needs. Not everyone is so lucky. Through the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society I volunteer to speak to people dealing with Hodgkin’s lymphoma, something I had […]


christina bach

6 Insider Tips for Successful Caregiving

Posted November 10th, 2015

November is Caregiver Awareness Month. This past weekend, I had the opportunity to co-facilitate a support group session for caregivers. This group is so brave and compassionate. They were so happy to find others who could validate some of the things they were going through and help them feel not so alone. Common themes emerged […]


Bob Riter

How to Help a Cancer Patient’s Caregiver

Posted March 5th, 2015

I often write columns that suggest ways that caregivers can help the person with cancer. Today, I want to suggest ways that the rest of us can help the caregiver. I’m defining caregiver as the person most involved in supporting the patient. It’s typically a spouse, child, parent, sibling, or friend. This is the person […]