Fallopian Tube Cancer: The Basics

Author: OncoLink Team
Last Reviewed: July 6, 2018

The fallopian tubes are a pair of tubes that join the ovaries to the uterus. Fallopian tube cancer is cancer that starts in the fallopian tubes. It is caused by fallopian tube cells growing out of control. As the number of cells grow, they form into a tumor. 

Fallopian tube cancer that has spread from the fallopian tubes to another part of the body is called metastatic cancer.

Risks

We don’t know the risks for getting fallopian tube cancer but they could be:

  • Infection or inflammation of the fallopian tubes
  • Not having children
  • Not having used birth control
  • A family member with fallopian tube cancer
  • Genetic mutations

Signs of Fallopian Tube Cancer

The signs can be:

  • Vaginal bleeding or discharge
  • Belly pain

Diagnosis of Fallopian Tube Cancer

When your healthcare providers think you may have fallopian tube cancer, they will order tests. Here are some of the tests:

These tests are important but a biopsy is the only way to know for sure if you have cancer. A biopsy:

  • Looks at a piece of the fallopian tube for cancer cells
  • Is used to find out the cancer type, how normal it is [grade], and if it has spread

A pathology report sums up these results and is sent to your healthcare provider, often 5-10 days after the biopsy. This report is an important part of planning your treatment. You can ask for a copy of your report for your records.

Staging Fallopian Tube Cancer

To guide treatment, fallopian tube cancer is "staged." This stage is based on:

  • Size and location of the tumor
  • Whether cancer cells are in the lymph nodes
  • Whether cancer cells are in other parts of the body

Stages range from stage I (smallest, most confined tumors) to stage IV (tumors that have spread to other parts of the body, also called metastatic cancer). The stage and type of fallopian tube cancer will guide your treatment plan.

Treatment

Often, these treatments are used:

  • Surgery can be used to remove the cancer. 
  • Radiation, the use of high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells, can be used before surgery to shrink the cancer. 
  • Chemotherapy, the use of medications to kill cancer cells, can be given after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are still in the body. 

This article is a basic guide to fallopian tube cancer. You can learn more about your type of fallopian tube cancer and treatment by using the links below.

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