Tanning Beds Are NOT a Safe Alternative to Sunbathing!

OncoLink Team
Last Modified: December 20, 2017

Tanning salons are not a safe alternative to the harmful rays of the sun. Studies have found that tanning salons are very harmful and lead to an increased risk of developing melanoma and other skin cancers. More than 419,000 cases of skin cancer diagnosed in the United States each year are associated with use of indoor tanning, 6,200 of those cases being melanoma. Those who first use a tanning bed before the age of 35 increase their risk of melanoma by 75 percent. It is estimated that 28 million Americans use indoor tanning devices each year at an estimated 25,000 tanning salons around the country.

About 87,110 cases of melanoma are diagnosed each year. Overall, melanoma is more common in men. However, cases in those under 40 are more likely to be in women, most likely due to increased use of tanning salons among women in this age group. In the past, there was about an average 20-year period from the time of greatest sun exposure to the development of melanoma, but in recent years, melanomas are being diagnosed at younger ages. More melanomas are being seen only a few years after exposure - one study found an average of 7 years between exposure and cancer development. Natural sun exposure and sunburns will add to a person's risk of developing skin cancer in their lifetime.

Both UVA and UVB (ultraviolet) rays can cause damage to the skin. Tanning bed light sources emit both. Contrary to some tanning bed industry claims, the UVB emitted by tanning bed light sources is of a sufficient level to cause melanoma, and the high level of UVA emitted by the light sources is known to induce DNA damage by producing free radicals that contribute to cancer formation. In addition to cancer, UVA and UVB rays can cause long-term skin damage, such as premature aging, wrinkles, and dark patches (lentigos, sometimes called age spots or liver spots).

Tanning, both indoor and outdoor causes more cases of skin cancer than smoking does of lung cancer. Twelve states and Washington D.C. have created prohibit people younger than 18 to use indoor tanning devices unless it has been prescribed by a provider.

Learn more from the Skin Cancer Foundation and the American Cancer Society

References

American Academy of Dermatology. Indoor Tanning. Found at: https://www.aad.org/media/stats/prevention-and-care

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Indoor Tanning Is Not Safe. April 26, 2017. Found at: https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/indoor_tanning.htm

Melanoma Research Foundation. Why is tanning dangerous? Found at: https://www.melanoma.org/understand-melanoma/preventing-melanoma/why-is-tanning-dangerous

Skin Cancer Foundation. https://www.skincancer.org

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